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Feet Up Hostel, Barcelona

We arrived in Barcelona on the overnight train. The bunks were sold out, so we were sentenced to sit upright for the eight hour journey. We watched a golden sunrise over fields, palm trees and the Mediterranean as the train crawled the last leg along the coast towards the city. A few photos were attempted, but it was quickly abandoned in favor of soaking up the beauty of this new place. We had only traveled 300 miles, but Madrid felt just as far away as Iowa.

Our hostel was on the northwestern edge of Barcelona. It had good reviews on hostelworld.com and was priced a few Euros less than the massive party hostels closer to the center. Plus, it was called Feet Up Hostel and they had a hammock. So, clearly, this was where we were going to stay.

We spent six days there and it was truly a home away from home. We met some wonderful people, had great late night conversations in the courtyard, cooked dinner most evenings in the kitchen and ate it on the rooftop, and had coffee and pastries at “our” neighborhood bakery every morning on our way to the metro.

30
May 2012
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Spain

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Los Amigos

In Iceland we spent two nights in a guesthouse, two nights Couchsurfing, and one night in a hotel. In Scotland we stayed with friends in a historic mansion. Spain has been all hosteling so far. By popular request (hi mom), here is what it’s like to stay in a hostel.

Los Amigos Hostel on Calle de Arenal, between the Sol and Opera metro stops, and is on the fourth floor. It’s just a few blocks from El Palacio Real and Plaza Mayor. From what we can tell, it has 50 or 60 beds. Rooms have anywhere from two twin beds to six bunks. The smaller rooms have their own bathroom, but the bigger rooms all share a co-ed community bathroom. Your bed includes a fitted sheet, a top sheet (sewn together at the bottom, kind of like an unzipped sleeping bag), a pillow, and a comforter with a duvet. The rooms all have lockers and you can either use your own padlock or rent one. Toast, cereal, tea, coffee and milk are served in the morning.

You can upgrade to a smaller room that has its own private bathroom, but we found that you felt bad taking a shower or using the bathroom for any extended period since you were still sharing it with other people, so we have been just staying in the 12 person room and using the co-ed bathroom. The shower stalls go down to your ankles and are deep enough that you can hang your clothes on the hook inside without them getting wet. Everyone is very respectful, so it’s not awkward at all.

The place isn’t spotless, but the housekeeper is sweeping and mopping and cleaning most of the day, so it’s about as good as it’s going to get with that many people coming through. It reminds me of camp in that respect.

We really like staying here. It’s actually pretty cosy. The front desk staff are all so friendly and speak English so they can help us out when we need it. Sometimes people come in late from partying and make too much noise, but that’s to be expected at any hostel. We didnt do much research, we pretty much just showed up and asked if they had two open beds. So that’s where we are.

02
May 2012
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Spain

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