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Beginning the New Year in Hanoi

One nice thing that came of our disorienting 29 hour hell bus ride to Hanoi, besides having new stories to tell and a certain sense of pride in having lived through it, was that we met Jay (“Boston” from the bus blog).

3 on a bike

Jay lives in Hanoi, and showed us around for a day. The three of us crammed onto his moped and he drove us past Ho Chi Minh’s mausoleum, around West Lake, and and through various neighborhoods that we probably wouldn’t have otherwise seen.

Bun cha restaurant

He took us to his favorite bún chả (say “boon-cha”) place, which ended up being our favorite dish, and looking back, this particular one was our favorite single meal in all of Vietnam. We’ll put it into our What We Ate in Vietnam compilation post later, but it’s good enough to be mentioned twice, so here is some bún chả.

Bún chả.

Fixing a bowl of bun cha

It’s fun to say, isn’t it? Bún chả. Bún chả. Bún chả! Ok, more on that later.

Went back to Jay’s apartment to check out the view from his roof and to play Scrabble.

View of West Lake

View of Hanoi

Apartment roof

Scrabble

Then back out to the Old Quarter for dinner, this time only two to a moped because Jay’s roommate, Lucca, joined us.

Jay and Lucca

And that was how we kicked off our month in Vietnam. (Thanks Jay!) Hanoi was pretty chilly and drizzly, but we really enjoyed being there. Here are some more things we saw in Hanoi (hover for a caption).

Extra special alcohol, New Day Restaurant, Old Quarter

Silk flower vendor, Old Quarter

Flower vendors' bikes, Old Quarter

Sidewalk market, Old Quarter

Street near Dong Xuan market

Toads for sale, Dong Xuan market

Rooster perching on a covered motorbike, Old Quarter

Bantam chickens, Old Quarter

Leafy green street, Old Quarter

Westlake

Porcelain vendor, Old Quarter

Shoe shop, Old Quarter

Vintage propaganda posters

Hanoi map at a sidewalk restaurant, Old Quarter

Hand carved wooden stamps, Old Quarter

Noodle makers

Ladies selling deep-fried bananas on the sidewalk, Old Quarter

Wall art, Pho Co (Hidden Cafe)

Busy street corner, northwest edge of Old Quarter

Colorful flags strung across Nguyen Huu Huan Street, Old Quarter

Peace sculpture at Hoàn Kiếm lake

Young couple posing for wedding photos at Hoàn Kiếm lake

Tony posing for photos at Hoàn Kiếm lake

Police officer taking photos of friends at Hoàn Kiếm lake

Upper wall at Hoa Lo Prison (the Hanoi Hilton)

Sculptures depicting Vietnamese imprisoned by the French at Hoa Lo Prison (the Hanoi Hilton)

Sculptures depicting Vietnamese imprisoned by the French at Hoa Lo Prison (the Hanoi Hilton)

Painted cell number at Hoa Lo Prison (the Hanoi Hilton)

Personal effects of American POWs at Hoa Lo Prison (the Hanoi Hilton)

John McCain's flight suit on display at Hoa Lo Prison (the Hanoi Hilton)

Sculptures at Bach Ma temple

Bach Ma temple courtyard

Packed sidewalk restaurant

Birds for sale, Old Quarter

Multilevel housing, Hàng Da street

Money offering, Temple of Literature

Two men smoking, Temple of Literature

Joss sticks burning on a dragon altar, Temple of Literature

Drum head detail, Temple of Literature

Roof tiles, Temple of Literature

Dragon head topiary, Temple of Literature

Rooster in a cage, next to Temple of Literature

Man resting in a green hammock, Nguyễn Thái Học street

Skateboarders at Lenin Park

Ho Chi Minh's mausoleum

Guards at Ho Chi Minh's mansion

Train tracks through a neighborhood

Exploring Hanoi was a great way to start 2013! Tết, the start of the Vietnamese new year, is a much bigger deal than the calendar new year, and it doesn’t happen until February this year. As for actual New Year’s Eve… we had drinks at a rooftop cafe overlooking Hoàn Kiếm lake and waited for fireworks that were rumored, but never happened. We shared a table with a couple from Alaska, traded travel stories and went to bed happy.

New Year's Eve in Hanoi

2013 floral arrangement, Temple of Literature

07
Feb 2013
POSTED BY admin
POSTED IN

Vietnam

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Motorbiking in Mae Hong Son Province

A man and his dog

North of Chiang Mai, there is a town called Pai. Apparently the journey to Pai used to take seven days by elephant before the road was built through the mountains a few decades ago. Now it takes three hours by minibus and either a strong stomach or motion sickness pills.

Pai walking street

Pai is full of backpackers and Thai tourists, rickety bungalows and boutiques and street stalls full of quirky, self-congratulatory souvenirs that proclaim the number of curves in the road one has endured to get there (762). There are unique caricature artists, and even some guy who runs around in full Jack Sparrow costume and sells postcards of himself. Not exactly a quiet place to escape to, but it’s an easy area to enjoy life.

Alicia and Satiya

Satiya's caricature of us

Little kitty at our bungalow

bungalows

tea vendors in Pai

Pai is also in the foothills of the Himalayas in the Mae Hong Son Province, which is considered one of the very best places in the world to motorcycle. A 125cc moped isn’t exactly a motorcycle, but you can rent them in Pai for less than $5 per day, so we decided to go for it. For several days, Tony drove us all over the valley, through villages, to the waterfalls, and down the rough gravel road up to the “secret” hot springs that is still in use as a village bath.

helmets

Pai Canyon

Sketchy bridge

Pam Bok waterfall

Harvested rice field near Pam Bok waterfall

Rapeseed field

Harvested rice field near Pai

Tony sliding down Mor Paeng waterfall

secret hot springs

Alicia at secret hot springs

On our last full day in Thailand, we decided to head about 40 km north to see Tham Lod, a large cave hear the Myanmar (Burma) border. We got a late start and the road wound tightly up and down the mountains. By the time we got to our destination, we realized we needed to turn right around if we wanted to make it back to Pai before dark. Then we passed a sign for Cave Lodge, which we remembered had been highly recommended to us by Kevin. We decided that the best thing to do would be to stay and see Tham Lod, spend the night at Cave Lodge, and then go back first thing in the morning.

Cave Lodge parking lot

Cave Lodge hammock

We hiked out to where the river exits Tham Lod, and got there just in time to watch thousands of swifts making their nightly return to cave at dusk.

Tham Lod

Swifts entering Tham Lod

This was the first time all year that our headlamps were really necessary, because we walked the trail back to Cave Lodge in the dark. We noticed what looked to be glittering dew all over the ground, but upon closer inspection, it was our lights reflecting in the eyeballs of every spider in the jungle. Jungles have lots of spiders.

spider in a cave

We were disappointed that we hadn’t carved out more time to spend up here, but were really thankful for our short taste of a pretty amazing place.

We woke up early the next morning and realized that while our decision to spend the night had given us the safety of traveling in daylight, we had sacrificed the heat of the day for it. Tony was wearing only a light shirt and shorts and it was a gray and damp morning and there was a mountain between us and the rising sun. But soon we were rewarded by amazing views of the mists in the valley below.

First view of the mists from above

hairpin curve in the road

Lone tree

tree - looking east

Lisu girl silhouette

By the time we made it to the top of the mountain we were nearly frozen solid and sprung for hot cups of instant noodles from the tourist concession stand. Some Lisu girls, who hang out at the scenic overlook to pose for photos in exchange for tips, were also eating their breakfast before they began their day.

Tony and the Lisu girls

slurp

The soup warmed us enough to continue and most of the rest of the way to Pai was in sunlight.

Burma is somewhere over there

Tony at the top of the mountain

reflection

We had to return the moped and leave for Laos that evening, but we’ll be looking for excuses to ride again soon.

28
Dec 2012
POSTED BY admin
POSTED IN

Thailand

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